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Sionann

DIY

Go-Bag for the Urban Witch DIY

go-bag

Lately, I’ve been trying to organize my life and efforts across the board. For the first time, I’m buying and using storage bins in my art studio. I’m categorizing notions and accessories and filing them away in their proper place. Part of this may be growing up, or an increased incentive to have a presentable and stress-free work/home environment. At any rate, I’m having a great time creating a place for everything and I’m super proud to bring you our first DIY tutorial! This DIY Go-Bag for the Urban Witch is a perfect weekend project and a great way to organize any magical supplies, sacred personal items, or even a small apothecary.

Sometimes you need to grab your supplies and hit the road in a pinch, whether it be the last minute work trip or a race to a sister in need, the best thing about this Go-Bag is that there are a ton of uses for it. It can serve as a sacred place for your travel altar or as a to-go apothecary/ medicine bag for when you’re on the move. The Go-Bag can even act as a general storage bag for magical items, stones, charms, and cards. The Go-Bag can serve whichever intention you choose. It’s up to you.

You can adjust the size of this bag based on when you intend to keep inside it. Increasing the 23″ measurement would make the bag taller/ deeper. Increasing the 15″ measurement would make the bag longer; you need the zipper to be 1″ longer than whatever your length measurement is.

GO-BAG SUPPLIESGo-Bag for the Urban Witch

  • Outer fabric 15″x23″
  • Fusible fleece
  • Inner fabric
  • Handle: 4×9 of exterior fabric and fusible fleece
  • Tab: 3×5 of interior fabric
  • 16″ zipper

Optional:

  • 4 flat bottom feet screws
  • 1 round stud fastener

GO-BAG INSTRUCTIONS

Part One:

A.) Collect all your supplies with your fabric cut to the correct size: 15″ x 23″ for bag “body” and fusible fleece and 4″ x 9″ of exterior fabric and fusible fleece for the handle. Fuse your fleece (also 15″ x 23″) to the wrong side of your handle and exterior fabric.

B.) Fuse your fleece (also 15″ x 23″) to the wrong side of your handle and exterior fabric. Now the wrong side of your handle and exterior fabric will be the fleece.

C.) Place your lining (interior fabric) right side up. Right side up means the side that will be exposed when finished is facing up.

D.) Open your zipper and line it up with the 15″ edge of your lining fabric and place it on top with the other zipper half hanging down. The pull of your zipper will be facing you. The zipper aligned as pictured, with stops 1/2″ away from the left side of the fabric. Align the exterior fabric face down/ wrong side up on top and pin for sewing. Sew your zipper with 1/4 seam allowance.

Go-Bag for the Urban Witch

Part Two:

E.) Keep your zipper open and flip the bottom raw edge of your top (exterior fabric) up so that it’s right sides are together and the bottom raw edge is now up with the zipper.

F.) Fold the outer fabric the same way to its right sides are together and its raw edge is aligned with the raw edge of the interior fabric. See in the photo below how each fabric is folded onto itself? Line up the zipper as before, this time with the zipper pull on the left.

Go-Bag for the Urban Witch

G.) Pin as shown below and sew with a 1/4″ seam allowance.

Go-Bag for the Urban Witch

Part Three:

H.) Turn the bag inside itself, so it appears as normal from the outside, with the interior fabric inside and exterior fabric outside.

I.) Top stitch your zipper on each side, going through both the exterior and lining, but not sewing it shut. You’ll have your zipper open to do this; it should end up looking top-stitched like pictured.

Go-Bag for the Urban Witch

Part Four:

J.) Now place your bag flat, zipped up, with the zipper down the center and pin through all fabrics as shown.

Go-Bag for the Urban Witch

Part Five:

K.) With your bag pinned, cut a 2 1/4″ L x 2″ H square at each corner.

Go-Bag for the Urban Witch

Part Six:

L.) Make your tab:

For the tab, fold each long edge to meet in the center and press.

Go-Bag for the Urban Witch

Then fold it in half width-wise, so the raw edges meet and press again.

Go-Bag for the Urban Witch

If you’re adding a metal tab, add it now.

Go-Bag for the Urban Witch

Top stitch the non-raw edges of the tab.

Go-Bag for the Urban Witch

Part Seven:

P.) Make Your handle:

For the handle, make sure you fused the fleece in Step One. You’ll do three folds. I find it helpful to press after each. Fold the long raw edges lengthwise to meet in the middle.

Then fold it once more in half, so your only raw edges are the 1″ ends and topstitch.

Part Eight:

Q.) Attach the tab and handle by first turning your interior and exterior fabric, so the wrong sides are out/ right sides together. Make sure all layers are aligned and unzip the zipper a few inches.

R.) Pin your handle on the end with the zipper pull as shown. Sew the aligned and pinned edge with a 1/2″ seam (or whatever your bag/ zipper allows if you resized or made mistakes it’s okay).

S.) Pin your tab upside down and “finished” end-inside in the same manner and sew the aligned edge.

T.) Turn your bag right side out through one of the square openings that are left unfinished.

Part Nine:

Now we’ll do a French seam on the square edges. A French seam is where you first sew a raw edge; then you sew over the seam from the interior to “trap” the raw edge completely. Here’s a link for french seams if it’s confusing.

U.) You’ll first want to reopen your square edge to create a box seam, this is accomplished by sewing from corner to corner, as shown. Pin each corner and sew.

V.) Trim the excess down. If you made mistakes or had rough cuts, you have had to increase seam allowance. Trim, so you only have about 1/4″ of a raw edge.

W.) Turn bag inside out. Push out your new square bottom/ corners. Use your pins to mark the seam allowance needed to trap the outer seam. Sew to complete.

X.) Your interior will look like this. Add your bag feet now if you wish, using a seam ripper to poke holes first where they will go through to the exterior.

Your completed go-bag will look like this:

Each Go-Bag will hold three or four 7 day candles, three large bundles of sage, one tarot deck, and other items as needed (crystals, pendulums, poppet, sachets, charms, travel altars, etc..) Check back here for more DIY’s and ideas for living creatively mindful.

*This post first appeared on I AM A HEALER.

Recipe

Vegan Ash-e Reshteh (Persian New Year Soup)

vegan ash-e reshteh

With Nowruz (Persian New Year, the Spring Equinox) right around the corner, I thought I’d post a recipe for a Vegan Ash-e Reshteh! There are many kinds of Ash you can make, but Ash-e Reshteh seems to be the most popular. It’s made throughout the year on my husband’s side of the family, and it’s always made for Nowruz.

I first learned to make Ash-e Reshteh shortly after my engagement to my husband. His mother had gifted me a Persian cookbook. Her quiet way of both welcoming me to the family and validating my suspicion that the key to keeping her son’s heart was through food. No doubt, I happily got to practicing my Ash and Beef Koobideh recipes, all while secretly plotting to find ways to make some of it vegan.

vegan ash-e reshteh

Ash-e Reshteh is a thick soup. It’s typically made with onion, beans, noodles, lentils, garlic, beet, spinach, herbs, spices, and beef broth. I’ve always substituted vegetable broth in the past and made a vegetarian version. Furthermore, the other non-vegan friendly ingredient is the kashk. Kashk is basically whey that’s stirred in at the end and added as a garnish. Oh, and the noodles are thought to bring luck into the New Year!

vegan ash-e reshteh

I’ve always wanted to make a Vegan Ash-e Reshteh! I thought this would be a great opportunity to try and finally make a vegan version using a recipe for garbanzo bean whipped cream I’d seen floating around.

I’m happy to share my recipe for Vegan Ash-e Reshteh.

vegan ash-e reshteh

Vegan Ash-e Reshteh

Print Recipe
Serves: 8+ Cooking Time: 1 hour

Ingredients

  • 3 tbsp. coconut oil
  • 2 large onion
  • 2 cans drained garbanzo beans
  • 1 can cannellini beans
  • 1 can red kidney beans
  • 1 heaping tbsp. garlic
  • 1 tbsp. turmeric
  • 1 heaping tsp. salt
  • 1 tsp. pepper
  • 9 cups of water (if using dried, soaked beans)
  • 10 cups veggie broth
  • 2 cups lentils
  • 1 pound linguini or Persian noodles
  • 2 tbsp. flour
  • 2 cups fresh dill
  • 3 cups fresh parsley
  • 12 cups of spinach
  • 1 beet
  • Liquid from garbanzo beans and some cream of tartar for "cream"
  • Garnish: Vegan cream and crispy caramelized onions (they're mandatory!)

Instructions

1

In a large pot heat your coconut oil over medium-high heat. Add your minced garlic and thinly sliced onion, saving some onion on the side for the garnish later. Stir fry until the onions are soft and beginning to brown

2

Add the beans, turmeric, salt and pepper and stir-fry for two minutes. If you used canned beans (I did) then you can skip Step 3

3

Add 9 cups of water and bring to a boil, reduce heat and continue cooking for 15 minutes

4

Add your veggie broth and lentils, continue cooking for 15 minutes

5

Add your noodles and slowly sift in your flour while stirring the pot. Allow the soup to cook, covered and on low, for another 15 minutes

6

Add your spinach, dill, parsley, and beet. Continue cooking another 10-15 minutes or until the noodles and lentils are both soft

7

*Add your vegan cream and stir in, saving some for the garnish.

8

Garnish with crispy caramelized onions and a dollop of "cream"

Notes

* Vegan cream: Simply combine the liquid from two cans garbanzo beans with 1/8 tsp. of cream of tartar and mix on high for 10-15 minutes or until stable and cream-like. **You can also just omit the cream entirely if you don't have a Kitchenaid or hand mixer. The soup is delicious anyway. ***The "cream" can collapse quickly and in a hot pot, it almost completely dissolves. I still liked it for the recipe because I felt it gave the soup a slightly creamier look.

Recipe

Colorful Mango Radish Coleslaw

mango radish coleslaw

Coleslaw is something I look forward to at every barbecue and potluck I attend. It’s a versatile dish and one of the more fun sides to experiment with. I came to the idea for this Mango Radish Coleslaw recipe after trying to decide on a side for my Sweet Potato Black Bean Veggie Burger. The colorful coleslaw was a perfect pairing choice and totally hit the mark!

I’m a coleslaw connoisseur. One of my favorites that I’ve had recently was a Texas style coleslaw. It was vegan but spoke to traditional Texas BBQ. The slaw had notes of paprika and chili powder, corn, red pepper, and a few other ingredients I love! It was a bit on the sweet side but smoky and robust as well. I fully intend to re-create it at some point, but for now, it’s Spring! I’d wanted to try something that would pair well with lighter flavors and go with the season.

I wanted to do a sweet, light coleslaw that was different from the norm. Something almost like a salad, full of color and flavor that dominated the mayo, rather than the other way around. It’s my firm opinion that fruits and color are highly underutilized in the coleslaw scene (is there a scene? I made that up). Some mango and radishes were on hand, so I decided to go for a Mango Radish Coleslaw.

I always incorporate ingredients that can easily be substituted for vegan options—this Mango Radish Coleslaw is no exception. This delightful dish is a delicious side and a perfect for a light snack.

mango radish coleslaw

Mango Radish Coleslaw

Print Recipe
Serves: 4 Cooking Time: 5-10 minutes

Ingredients

  • 2 cups angel hair cut cabbage/ slaw
  • 2 medium mangos, diced
  • 6 radishes, sliced
  • 1 tbsp. honey or agave
  • 1 tsp. Thai sweet chili sauce
  • 2 tbsp. mayonnaise, veganaise, or avocado
  • Juice of 1 lemon or 1/3 cup lemon juice
  • 1 medium red pepper, diced
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • Garnish: Cherry tomatoes

Instructions

1

Slice your radishes, mangos, peppers, and grate your cabbage for slaw if you're making your own

2

Mix it all in a bowl, adding your dressings and seasonings last to toss

3

Serve!

DIY Lifestyle

Two Cute Ways to Repurpose Leftover Bunting

repurpose leftover bunting

We all have extra stuff lying around. Some of it is really useful, while some of it just takes up space. Anyone who has thrown a wedding or a big birthday knows that decor is no exception. I was eyeing all my extra stuff from our wedding and my eyes fell on all this extra burlap bunting we never used. There are quite a few tutorials out there on how to turn old wrapping paper and clothes into bunting. However, I couldn’t find many on how to actually repurpose leftover bunting.

I was thinking of various ways to use the bunting by folding it. Maybe a geometric ornament or putting a few together could make a hat or a lantern bag for a flameless candle? Eventually, I landed on an idea for a flat wallet and an air plant/ succulent holder; two cute ways to repurpose leftover bunting into new items and quick DIY projects.

FLAT WALLET

This project is great for a craft night or even for a kids party. You can complete the project by sewing OR even with a hot glue gun. Kids will love seeing how you can transform “junk” decor into something cool, useful, and personalized. Furthermore, with cute themed birthdays, the kids could end up with adorable spiderman wallets at the end of the party from the branded bunting.

I used a few items in the creation on my DIY Flat Wallet:

  • Burlap bunting
  • Scissors
  • Leftover random charms/ beads
  • Round bag making stud
  • Vinyl snap
  • Sewing machine (although you can hand stitch or use a glue gun instead)

Step One:

Collect your supplies. If you have a glue gun you’ll be using, plug it in! This is a quick project.

DIY flat wallet

Step Two:

Fold the bottom of the bunting a little over 1/3 of the way up. Test the triangle flap to make sure it covers the amount of space you want it to and doesn’t overlap the bottom.

DIY flat wallet

Step Three:

Flip the bunting over while keeping it folded. Draw a line to mark where the edges overlap.

leftover bunting

 

Step Four:

Cut the bunting on the lines you marked.

DIY flat wallet

Step Five:

Line up your wallet how it will lay when complete. Line up where you want your snap to be.

DIY flat wallet

Step Six:

Line up your first snap and sew the snap down to the wallet body (not the flap).

DIY flat wallet

Step Seven:

Pin the edge of your wallet for sewing and sew.

DIY flat wallet

Step Eight:

Attach the second snap to the interior of the flap.

DIY flat wallet

Step Nine:

Begin to attached your embellishments/ charms/ decor/ or embroidery to your wallet. Use a needle and thread or a hot glue gun.

DIY flat wallet

Fin!

repurpose leftover bunting

Air Plant/ Succulent Holder

The second cute way to repurpose leftover bunting is to turn it into a cute geometric planter. You can hang it on the wall or put it on a shelf. I used basically the same process for the dimensions as the wallet, the only difference is that instead of cutting the extra from the sides. You bring the edges pictured with the pink markers together and top stitch to create a tiny planter.

I used a few items in the creation on my Air Plant/ Succulent Holder:

  • Burlap bunting
  • Scissors
  • Sewing machine (although you can hand stitch or use a glue gun instead)
  • A piece of coral I found on the beach in Bali
  • Neon Green Thread

reuse leftover bunting

 

Once you’re done with the stitching you can add some stitches in a cool color, or add fabric to the front. I even considered using paint or dip dye on mine. Have fun with it!

reuse leftover bunting

reuse leftover bunting

I hope you enjoyed these ideas on how to repurpose leftover bunting!

Recipe

Vibrant Roasted Red Beet Hummus

Roasted Red Beet Hummus

The first time I had roasted red beet hummus, I was a total stranger to all things beets. As a teenager, I worked at a Round Table Pizza (if you don’t know what that is, you aren’t missing much). I had to work the salad bar basically every shift. These duties included refilling the various toppings. One of them—you guessed it—was beets. I’m sure the beets were canned or something, but the smell of 3 gallons of beets in juice was enough to make my stomach turn.

It took me exactly fifteen years to get over my repulsion, and it was roasted red beet hummus that did the trick!

The gorgeous color of this mysterious dip captivated me the first time I had it at a party. Once I learned it was beet hummus, I was disgusted (of course) but I didn’t want to be rude, so I tried it. It was delicious! The essence of beet was still there, but it was leveled out by the chickpeas and garlic. I was in love! This led to me eventually trying beet in my juices and now I really love it.

This roasted red beet hummus is a beautiful addition to any table. Hummus is already a healthy dish. Beets enhance it as a great source of folate (vitamin B9), fiber, manganese, vitamin C, potassium, and iron.

Roasted Red Beet Hummus

Print Recipe

Ingredients

  • 2 medium sized beets, roasted
  • 1 can of chickpeas (drained and rinsed)
  • 2 heaping tbsp. of tahini
  • Juice of 2 lemons
  • Zest of 1 lemon
  • 3 cloves of garlic
  • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • 1/4-1/3 cup of olive oil

Instructions

1

Preheat your oven to 425 degrees F

2

Rub beets with a little olive oil and wrap individually in foil, place on a baking sheet and roast for 1-1.5 hours

3

Allow beets to cool, then cut them into 1" cubes for blending

4

Place all ingredients into a blender and blend until smooth. Add water if you need to thin it out

5

Refrigerate at least 2 hours before serving (I just like cold hummus)

DIY

DIY Square Bottom Tarot Pouch

DIY Tarot Pouch

Sometimes you just need a tarot pouch! People choose to carry their tarot in different ways. Some, neatly keep the cards in their original box to bring out when they want to do a spread. Many carry their cards wrapped in a special cloth and in a pouch similar to this.

With the tarot often looked to for guidance in weighty decisions, why not treat your deck as the sacred item it is?

If you buy crystals, pendulums, and divination tools regularly, you’ll often have a small collection of velvet or plastic lined pouches at your disposal. These can be useful, but boring. For the urban witch, you might choose to carry your tarot cards in a more stylish and personalized way. That’s where this DIY Tarot Pouch comes in handy. It’s easy to make and requires very little fabric. Furthermore, this tarot pouch makes a great conversation starter, everyone will wonder where you procured such a cool bag for your cards.

This DIY will take about 30 minutes to complete depending on your skill level.

For this tarot pouch you’ll need:

  • (1) 10.5″ x 11″ exterior cloth
  • (1) 10.5 x 11″ interior lining cloth
  • Scissors
  • A sewing machine or needle and thread
  • Rope or extra fabric to create a cord
  • Set of tarot cards

Step One:

Take your lining fabric and your exterior fabric and place them with their right sides together. Pin the top edge (that will be the opening). Sew with a 1/4″ seam allowance and press the seam open afterward.

tarot pouch

 

Step Two:

Open your fabric so that the wrong sides are facing up as shown. Cut 1/2″ tabs on the sides of each fabric, this will mark where your cord will go.

tarot pouch

Step Three:

Press your tabs for sewing. You can do a double-fold hem or a single fold and keep the interior edges raw. I did a double fold because my fabric comes apart easily and I didn’t want any rogue string coming out the drawstring area.

tarot pouch

Step Four:

Sew the hem so it secures the raw edge of the fabric (or not if you don’t care).

tarot pouch

Step Five:

Fold your fabric in half length-wise to that the exterior fabric is exposed and the lining fabric is touching itself. Make sure your tabs line up. Pin the raw edges of the fabric together.

tarot pouch

Step Six:

Sew with a 1/4″ seam allowance. You can do a larger seam if it’s easier, you’ll cut the excess off anyway. Make sure to not sew over your drawstring opening. Otherwise, you’ll seal it shut!

tarot pouch

Step Seven:

Flip your fabric inside out so the exterior is touching and the exterior fabric is outside. This is a weird kind of double inside out. If you’re used to making bags, you know what I mean, but if not, I’ve attached the following video to explain.

Find the seam of the long edge that you just sewed (and trimmed down as much as possible) and pin it neatly.

tarot pouch

 

Step Eight:

You’ll now hide the raw edge of the seam by sewing down that same section (called a french seam), trapping the exterior seam inside. See, the drawstring opening is still open!

tarot pouch

Step Nine:

Turn your fabric inside out with the side seam directly in the center. At the bottom of your pouch, cut two small squares that are slightly taller than they are wide. I did around 1″.

tarot pouch

Step Ten:

Sew the very bottom raw edge of the bag closed, excluding the squares. Then, turn the squares so the bottom seam is in the center and pin them in a straight line. This will square out the bottom of your pouch. Sew each side to have squared edges. ***I should add that you don’t have to do a french seam here, I just didn’t want any raw edges on my interior, you could totally just turn the bag inside out and hem the bottom, making sure to turn the square areas.

tarot pouch

Step Eleven:

Turn the bag inside out once more and trap those raw edges with a french seam. You’ll do this on the raw edges you just sewed—so the bottom, and each squared corner.

tarot pouch

Step Twelve:

Now turn your tarot pouch inside out and insert your drawstring. It’s best to attach a safety pin to the drawstring and lead it through the opening as shown in this video. I couldn’t find a safety pin so I improvised with sewing needles.

I hope you found this DIY Tarot Pouch useful! I’d love to see pictures of the pouches you create! Tag me on IG: @thornandthimble

DIY Lifestyle

Envelope Style Pillow DIY

Envelope Style Pillow DIY

In our home, we have a problem that my husband affectionately calls “pillow hell.” I do purchase an excessive amount of throw pillows…but there’s a method to my madness! When it comes to decorating, like many people, I like a strong neutral base. Having a gray couch instead of a green one allows me to use pillows and various other decor to set the tone. When I get sick of it, I can just swap it out for what’s in style or season. Which brings me to my inspiration for doing this Envelope Style Pillow DIY!

The other day I saw a tutorial for a Cactus Pillow Outline DIY on A Beautiful Mess and a lightbulb went off. I’d been going about this all wrong! Instead of being a weirdo pillow hoarder I can just make different pillow covers to switch out, saving space and lots of cash!

Lucky for me, I’m also a fabric hoarder. Whenever I’m at a fabric store downtown like Michael Levine, I always pick up a yard of a few Ikats and styles that speak to me. These types of fabric can get really pricey (like $18 a yard, that’s pricey, right?) so I love the option to pick up a little bit to use as a chair cushion cover, purse, or as part of a handmade gift. My textile obsession definitely paid off when I went to create my Envelope Style Pillow DIY. I had quite a few Ikats and other fabrics to choose from. In the end, I chose a beautiful earth and jewel toned Ikat and a bright orange cotton duck for my Envelope Style Pillow DIY.

I already had a pillow (as evidenced from my pillow hoarding), this one came with a comforter set from Ross that I’d just been clinging on to. It’s been traveling aimlessly around our bedroom floor forever and I thought it deserved a better life.

Let’s go, Envelope Style Pillow DIY!

You’ll need:

  • A pillow you hate
  • Fabric, I used two kinds one for the front, one for the back
  • Scissors
  • Pins
  • A sewing machine (or the patience for hand sewing)

Step 1:

Mark the fabric for the back/ envelope side of the pillow for cutting. Gave an extra 1″ on each side of the pillow to allow for the height/ stuffing. I just eyed it, it isn’t rocket science.

I used a white fabric pencil to mark my cuts.

Step 2:

Once you cut out the fabric square for the back, cut it in half just a little off center.

Step 3:

Repeat the process of marking and cutting the front piece of fabric. You can use the back piece as a guide for the height, but the width will be uniform (since you won’t be doing an fabric overlap in front).

Envelope Style Pillow DIY

Step 4:

You can see that the front piece is less wide than the back piece.

Envelope Style Pillow DIY

Step 5:

Pin your back pieces for a hem where they’ll “meet” (if you’re doing a hem).

Envelope Style Pillow DIY

Step 6:

Sew your hem. You can match the thread color if you’re OCD, but I don’t care and my husband won’t notice, so I just used what was in my machine. Pin the fabrics with the right side of the fabrics facing each other and with the fabric for the back of your pillow overlapped as shown. Sew around the exterior border with a 1/2″ seam allowance.

Envelope Style Pillow DIY

Step 7:

Look, you completed my Envelope Style Pillow DIY!

Envelope Style Pillow DIY

Step 8:

Stuff your pillow in your new Envelope Style Pillow Cover.

Envelope Style Pillow DIY

 

Envelope Style Pillow DIY

 

Let me know in the comments if you liked this Envelope Style Pillow DIY tutorial!

 

Recipe

Vegan Fried Shishito Pepper / Okra Dish

Vegan Fried Shishito Pepper

*This was originally posted as Vegan Fried Okra, but apparently it’s Shishito Peppers! Lol I’m an idiot. The recipe is great for either, though, so carry on!

Southern cooking has my heart. All the delicious, buttery comfort food gives me the warm and fuzzies. I’m a huge fan of The Pioneer Women, Ree. After getting her cookbook a few years ago, I immediately began cooking anything and everything Southern. Just ask my husband or brother, for a while they’d come home to a new pie every day. I felt like a Disney Princess, whistling around my kitchen, in hopes that a group of birds would come in and help with the dishes. One of my favorite southern dishes is Fried Okra! Now that I’m blogging with more of an emphasis on Vegan/ Veg food, I thought I’d give you a Vegan Fried Okra Shishito Pepper dish to try for yourself! I’d never made it before, so this was a great opportunity to learn something new!

As much as I love Sothern Cooking, my waistline doesn’t. This Vegan Fried Shishito Pepper dish is one of the rare unhealthy things that you’ll see me post. It’s deep fried, covered in corn meal and flour goodness, and guaranteed to please. Just maybe walk around a bit after you eat it 😝

For thisVegan Fried Shishito Pepper/ Okra dish, I made a few modifications to try to get the best consistency possible. I used unsweetened almond milk instead of the buttermilk the traditional recipe calls for, and after the first batch, I thickened the almond milk up a little by adding 1/2 teaspoon of Xanthan Gum. Xanthan gum is a “natural” thickener, and it’s great to use in smoothies, dressings, and soups as well. I was turned on to it during my raw vegan days. It gets some flack because it’s unclear if it’s bad for you or not, but I figured if I’m deep-frying my dinner, who tf cares?? You judge for yourself, I’m not yo momma!

Additionally, for this Vegan Fried Shishito Pepper recipe, I tried using Panko (bread crumbs) in addition to the corn meal and flour mix. This combination didn’t work as well as I’d thought because the almond milk was still a bit runny. If I had been using a recipe with egg or butter, it might have worked better. In the end, I found that the corn meal and flour mix did the best job of (kind of) keeping the breading on the okra.

Okay, here we go with Vegan Fried Shishito Pepper!

  1. Gather and rinse your Shishito Peppers/ okraVegan Fried Okra
  2. Cut off the stem and bottom of your Shishito Peppers/ okra, then slice into 1″ pieces Vegan Fried Okra
  3. Mix your dry ingredients (cornmeal, flour, salt, pepper, seasoning), and mix your almond milk with your xanthan gum in a separate bowl, and put your oil in a deep frying/ sauté pan and warm it over medium heatVegan Fried Okra
  4. Set up a little assembly line for yourself next to your stove. Dunk your shishito peppers/ okra morsels into the almond milk to coat it, then cover it with the dry mix, so it’s completely covered Vegan Fried Okra
  5. Gently—so you don’t burn yourself—drop the shishito peppers/ okra into the hot oil. Sorry, no picture of steps five and six because I was trying to not set myself aflame!
  6. You may have to do it in batches, when the okra is a nice golden brown, transfer it onto a cookie sheet with a layer of paper towels on it, to help soak up and drain some of the oil
  7. Serve with your favorite other southern dishes; I chose mashed potatoes! Vegan Fried Okra

 

 

Vegan Fried Okra

Print Recipe
Serves: 4 Cooking Time: 20 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1 lb. of Okra, rinsed and cut
  • 3-6 cups of oil depending on the depth of your pan. You want the okra to be able to fully submerge, but the pan half full or less
  • 1/2 cup corn meal
  • 1 cup of flour
  • 1/2 tsp. xanthan gum
  • 1 cup of almond milk
  • 1/4 tsp. of paprika
  • 1/4 tsp. cayenne pepper
  • 1/2 cup of seasoning salt
  • 1/4 cup black pepper
  • 1/8 cup of garlic powder (or 1/4 if you don't have seasoning salt) LESS IS MORE

Instructions

1

Gather and rinse your okra

2

Cut off the stem and bottom of your okra, then slice into 1" pieces

3

Mix your dry ingredients (cornmeal, flour, salt, pepper, seasoning), and mix your almond milk with your xanthan gum in a separate bowl

4

Put your oil in a deep frying/ sauté pan and warm it over medium heat

5

Set up a little assembly line for yourself next to your stove. Dunk your okra morsels into the almond milk to coat it, then cover it with the dry mix, so it's completely covered

6

Gently—so you don't burn yourself—drop the okra into the hot oil

7

You may have to do it in batches, when the okra is a nice golden brown, transfer it onto a cookie sheet with a layer of paper towels on it, to help soak up and drain some of the oil

8

Serve with your favorite other southern dishes; I chose mashed potatoes!

Recipe

Simple 4 Ingredient Recipe for Vegan Parmesan

Recipe for Vegan Parmesan

A recipe for vegan Parmesan is a must in any vegan kitchen! After all, one of the things that turns a lot of people away from veganism is the lack of cheese. I’m not vegan anymore, but when I was considering trying it years ago, I couldn’t picture myself abstaining from parmesan on my pasta or pizza. Vegan cheese has come really far since the 90’s, I mean cashew cheese like changed everything. Meltable vegan cheese?? Yes, please!

Oftentimes with veganism the thing people miss is the consistency or texture that comes from cheeses and creams. Furthermore, in a lot of cooking cream based sauces can be a vehicle for other spices and flavors. Vegan cheeses with a cashew base have revolutionized raw and vegan cooking. This recipe for vegan Parmesan is no exception!

Use it to top salads, rice bowls, pasta, and in your raw vegan creations! I love to use it on a vegan Caesar or even to garnish a soup. Again, the possibilities are endless.

Wow your naysayer guests with this recipe for vegan parmesan.

Recipe for Vegan Parmesan

Print Recipe
Serves: 4 Cooking Time: 5 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1 cup of raw cashews
  • 4 tbsp nutritional yeast
  • 3/4 tsp salt (add more for taste, start slow if you don't enjoy saltiness)
  • 1/3 tsp garlic powder

Instructions

1

Add all ingredients to a blender or food processor until it's super fine and resembles Parmesan cheese flakes. You're done!

Attempts DIY

DIY Ritual Bath Bomb

DIY Ritual Bath Bomb

This DIY Ritual Bath Bomb is ideal for a ritual soak/ cleanse. With the New Moon today, I thought I’d share this recipe to aide you in any intention setting and spellwork you might do. It’s a New Moon in Pisces/ Solar Eclipse and it’s a perfect time to set intentions rooted in emotion and honesty to oneself. Furthermore, you can take advantage of the new moon’s energy for a couple of days afterward, so please do! You’re not too late.

I recommend charging some amethyst or citrine under the new moon tonight for use in your future DIY Ritual Bath Bomb. You can use the charged stones as part of your rituals throughout the month. Oftentimes I strategize what color, essential oil, and crystal are best suited to my intention before making a bath bomb that reflects those things.

When I first attempted to make my own DIY Ritual Bath Bomb I was filled with such feelings of grandiose, it’s embarrassing. Like all of us, I’ve seen at least a dozen tutorials for bath bombs over the years. I figured they were missing something, though. As a witch and budding herbalist, I had a ton of ideas for bringing more intention and herbal remedy to the notion of a bath bomb.

I want to be 100% real with you here, I was certain that I was on the cusp of starting my DIY Ritual Bath Bomb empire—before I’d even tried to make a single bath bomb. The problem was in the execution.

I think I used a recipe that had too much moisture, which resulted in my bath bombs drying up and cracking and generally crumbling apart. I was pretty devastated. In the end, I used a recipe that makes smaller batches (2 large mold or 4 small molds) bath bombs. I’m so happy with the result! This is a perfect device to help you clear yourself of negative energies and to activate your intentions, inviting the things that you want into your life. Enjoy!

 

DIY Ritual Bath Bomb

You’ll need round metal bath bomb molds, mixing bowl(s), a whisk, and a foil wrapped cookie sheet for drying.

 

DIY Ritual Bath Bomb

Start by mixing all of your dry ingredients in a bowl. If you’re using dry herbs, you can mix those in with your dry ingredients or create pockets later. If you’re using powder color pigment, that counts as dry. However, if you’re using food coloring, that will go with your wet ingredients. Use your whisk to combine all the ingredients until it’s pretty uniform

DIY Ritual Bath Bomb

Mix your wet ingredients in a separate bowl. That’s your essential oil, almond/ coconut oil, water, and optional food coloring. Use a spoon to slowly add drops of your wet ingredients to your dry ingredients. Whisk as you do this to combine them. If it starts to fizz a lot, slow down.

DIY Ritual Bath Bomb

Once all your ingredients are combined you add any flower petals or herbs you’re using. Then you can begin to make the molds.

DIY Ritual Bath Bombs

Press a handful of your mix into a mold until it’s flush with the top and smooth. Smooth around the sides of the rim to eliminate a rim from the final product. Each half should be just a tiny bit heaping.

DIY Ritual Bath Bomb

Press each half together firmly. Flip so that one-half is sitting on top of the other. Carefully take the mold off the top half and set the bottom half down so the ball can begin to dry. That should take 15 minutes or so. After the DIY Ritual Bath Bomb has been drying a little bit, carefully flip it over so the exposed half of the bath bomb is down and carefully take the other half of the mold off.

DIY Ritual Bath Bomb

Allow the totally exposed bath bombs to dry overnight for at least 8 hours before using or wrapping them.

Enjoy this DIY Ritual Bath Bomb recipe!

DIY Ritual Bath Bomb

Print Recipe
Serves: 2 Cooking Time: 30 minutes

Ingredients

  • 4 oz. of baking soda/ sodium bicarbonate
  • 2 oz. of citric acid
  • 2 oz. of corn starch
  • 2 oz. of sea salts or Epsom salts (sea salt is more mineral rich while Epsom salt is just magnesium. Both will aide aches and pains, sea salt is better for clearing negative energy as you would before a ritual)
  • 1-1.5 tsp. of water
  • 1 tsp. essential oil (10-15 drops)
  • 1 1/4 tsp almond/ coconut carrier oil
  • Molds or cookie cutter shapes
  • Optional: Color pigment or food coloring and dried herbs

Instructions

1

You'll need round metal bath bomb molds, mixing bowl(s), a whisk, and a foil wrapped cookie sheet for drying

2

Start by mixing all of your dry ingredients in a bowl. If you're using dry herbs, you can mix those in with your dry ingredients or create pockets later. If you're using powder color pigment, that counts as dry. If you're using food coloring, that will go with your wet ingredients. Use your whisk to combine all the ingredients until it's pretty uniform

3

Mix your wet ingredients in a separate bowl. That's your essential oil, almond/ coconut oil, water, and optional food coloring.

4

Use a spoon to slowly add drops of your wet ingredients to your dry ingredients as you whisk to combine them. If it starts to fizz a lot, slow down.

5

Once all your ingredients are combined you can begin to make the molds. Press a handful of your mix into a mold until it's flush with the top and smooth. Smooth around the sides of the rim to eliminate a rim from the final product. Each half should be just a tiny bit heaping.

6

Press each half together firmly. Flip so that one-half is sitting on top of the other. Carefully take the mold off the top half and set the bottom half down so the entire ball can begin to dry a bit (15 minutes or so). After the DIY Ritual Bath Bomb has been drying a little bit, carefully flip it over so the exposed half of the bath bomb is down and carefully take the other half of the mold off.

7

Allow the totally exposed bath bombs to dry overnight for at least 8 hours before placing them into a bath, cellophane, or packaging/ wrap.